Dean School, Newton-le-Willows

Details relating to its early history and later domestic use were discovered during the course of this research. Information about its builder and later residents will also be considered, along with some details about the Dean School Trust set up by the original builder of the property. THE FOUNDATION OF THE SCHOOL Dean School, or Dene School, was founded in 1677 by John Stirrup.(1) The building was erected on a piece of barren land.(2) The date of construction is cited on an inscription that was over the front entrance to…

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AirCrash – Supermarine Attacker – 05/02/1953

Supermarine Attacker FB.1 WA535 – 05/02/1953 On Thursday 5 th February 1953 Mr Roy Edwin Collingwood (all commissioned Pilots were known as Mr) took off from Royal Naval Air Station Stretton ? ?HMS Blackcap? near Warrington in Supermarine Attacker FB.1, No WA535 on what was to be his 3 rd ?Famil? (Familiarisation) flight at 15:30 hours. At 15:32 hours he was given ?Go? on Channel Baker, and at 15:37 hours he was called up by Mr Lines, who was then flying a Meteor aircraft. In the course of a short…

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Newton-le-Willows

To my heart there is no dearer spot upon earth, Than Newton-le-Willows, the place of my birth! Oh! The world has allurements to tempt us to roam, But it cannot supply the endearments of home. Dear Newton! Ill sing of thy sylvan retreats, Of thy lanes, and thy tree-shaded dwellings and streets, Of thy bridge oer the brook with its vista of bloom– A vision of beauty and store of perfume! I will sing of thy ancient, historical hall Near the old ruined mill with its miniature falls The strangers…

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Newton Glass Works

This Shows the location of the Glass Works In relation to Crow Lane, The Glass works (red) stands on the site where we know have the Fire Station, Opposite is the Brick Works, Windy Bank House (blue) is still standing, but all of the Glass Works or its Railway line are both long gone. This as far as I can tell is the only image that exists that shows anything of the Glass Works, you can see to the right of this image, in the distance the bottle shaped kilns…

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The Liverpool & Manchester Railway

The Cotton Trade In the latter part of the eighteenth century, the area surrounding the port of Liverpool and the growing town of Manchester was rapidly expanding. The American colonies had played a large part in promoting Liverpool as the port of import, and Manchester as the finishing centre for their cotton. Liverpool also dealt with the importation of rum, tobacco and slaves as well as establishing itself as the chief trading port with Ireland ? importing yarn which was then sent to Manchester. As an example of the enormous…

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A history of the Vulcan Foundry

In September, 1830, the Liverpool and Manchester Railway was opened, and to digress, here is a brief account of the ceremony. Being one of the first passenger lines in the country, its development must have had a profound influence on the policy and prosperity of the Vulcan Foundry, and the Locomotive industry as a whole during its early years, apart from its interest to all dwellers in South West Lancashire in its effect on the industrial life of the district. T. & S. Stone. The original stone inscribed T. &…

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South Lancashire Conservative Association

The South Lancashire Conservative Association has scarcely been founded three years, and yet during that short period it has enrolled as members all the talent, wealth, and influence of that portion of the palatinate from whence it takes its name. To perpetuate the society a building for the accommodation of its members has been erected since the last anniversary dinner, which is at once the most prominent object in the town of Newton, and we trust will be a lasting monument of the good old English feeling which raised it.…

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Newton Hall : Archaeological Excavation

I tried as best I could to get video of Mark Adams giving details of what they had found in their excavation, and some video of Stan & John Boydell explaining the layout and uses of the various buildings; Please remember these clips are not edited at all, i have about 2 hrs of different clips from different days that i managed to visit the site, and I hope that when it’s all put together, I will end up with a little fly on the wall type documentary of the…

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The Lake – Poem by J H Lane

I. FULL sixty years ago, a pretty vale (Now hidden neath the waters of the lake) Extended, in a winding course, from where The railway arches span the road and brook, To Castle Hill, and thence, diverging, ran Eastwards to Golborne Dale, and westwards joined The little sylvan valley of the Dene. Adown each vale a rippling streamlet flowed, Which, at the hill commingling, journeyed on Twixt flowery banks, and murmured past the spot Where now the strong embankment separates The winding lake and willow-shaded brook, Until it reached the…

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St Peter’s Mission & All Saints Church, Crow Lane

To the Members of the Church of England dwelling at the Earlestown end of the Parish of St. Peter, Newton-in-Makerfield. DEAR FRIENDS, For your benefit we propose to hold. during the coming Winter and Spring, in the large room of the Mill Residence in Fairclough Street, to be entered from the Mill Yard by a new staircase 1. Divine Service every SUNDAY EVENING at 6-30; and also every THURSDAY EVENING at 8 o’clock, for which Prayer Books and Hymn Books will be supplied. 2. Sunday School every SUNDAY AFTERNOON from…

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Newton in 1745

At this period the wages of an agricultural labourer were 10d per day without food, and 5d if his master provided him with meals. Carpenters and masons received ls 6d per day. The wants of the people, however, were few, and food was cheap, and a shilling had greater purchasing power than it has in the present day. In the early part of the 18th century the manufacture of woollens and of silk was encouraged, to the detriment of cottons and calicoes, and made rapid strides. Probably about this time…

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Newton-in-Makerfield : yr 1825-35

NEWTON IN MACKERFIELD. NEWTON IN MACKERFIELD is a small Borough Town and Chapelry in the Parish of Winwick, and in the Hundred of West Derby; 5 miles N. of Warrington, and 7 miles S. of Wigan. This Borough contains 275 houses, occupied by 289 families, consisting of 1643 persons. Of these families 56 are employed chiefly in agriculture, 221 in trade,” manufactures, or handicraft, and the remaining 13 are either engaged in professional pursuits or unemployed. The rental of the lands, messuages, and other buildings in the township, according to…

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Newton – The Market and Fairs

In 42nd Henry III. (1258), Robert Banastre, the fourth baron of that name, obtained the Kings charter for a fair and market at his manor of Newton . Forty-three years afterwards a market and two fairs were granted by Edward I. to John de Langton – the market to be held every Saturday, and the fairs on the eve,day, and morrow of St. John (6th May) and of St. Germain (31st July). In 1536 the former was described by Leland (King Henry VIII.s antiquary) as “a little poore market.” This…

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McCORQUODALE & CO. LTD. 1846-1937

THE following appeared in a newspaper published in 1846: “The capacious building at Newton, on the north side of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, known until recently as the “Legh Arms Hotel” is being converted into a general printing office.” A printing office in a village like Newton, however humble in pretension, a year ago would have been considered one of the greatest wonders of the age. Wonders do, however, occasionally appear, and one of the greatest we Know of is the conversion in such a place, of a building…

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Newton, 1800 & 1834

NEWTON, LANCASHIRE. Newton, commonly called Newton in the Willows, is five miles from Warrington, seven from Wigan, IS from Preston, 45 from Lancaster, and 1SS from London, in the road from Warrington to Wigan. It is an ancient borough by prescription, governed by a steward, bailiff, and burgesses, and returns two members to Parliament. The right of election is supposed to be in the burgesses, though there is no resolution of the House of Commons respecting it. The steward of the lord of the manor and the bailiff are the…

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