Winwick: History and Antiquities: Part 112014-01-05T11:37:19+00:00

WINWICK : ITS HISTORY AND ANTIQUITIES.
By WILLIAM BEAMONT. Second Edition, 1878

CONTENTS.

Part 1. Etymology of Winwick.
Part 2. Oswald, King of Northumbria.
Part 3. The Domesday Survey.
Part 4. The Church.
Part 5a. The Rectors of Winwick. 1192 – 1520
Part 5b. The Rectors of Winwick. 1520 – 1610
Part 5c. The Rectors of Winwick. 1610 – 1659
Part 5d. The Rectors of Winwick. 1659 – 1764
Part 5e. The Rectors of Winwick. 1764 – 1866
Part 6. The Winwick Chantries.
Part 7. The Grammar School.
Part 8. Some Winwick Antiquities.
Part 9. Some Winwick Names and Notabilities.
Part 10. Some Funeral Inscriptions in the Church and Churchyard.

Part 11. Bibliography

BIBLIOGRAPHY

(1). Thorpe’s " Diplomatarium Anglicanum," 352.
(2). There seems to be no authority for the suggestion made in Hardwicke’s Folk Lore, p. 163 n., that there was once a brook at Winwick called Wynwede.
(3) " Quisfuit Alcides ? Quis Caesar Julius ? aut quis Magnus Alexander ? Alcides se superasse fertur; A exander mundum, sed Julius hostem. Se simul Oswaldus et mundum vicit et hostem/’—Britannia, III., 493.
(4) Chester Historic Society’s Proc edings, Nos. 8 and 9, p. 161. also See an interesting account of swald in " Green’s History of the English People," p. 22, et seq.
(5) Oswestry, in Shropshire, disputes with Winwick the honour of being the place where Oswald fell. He is said to have been defeated and slain there at a place called Dyffryn Maes Hir, now Croes Oswald, Oswald’s Tree, or Oswestry, from the King’s mangled body being exposed as a Christian convert on three wooden crosses by order of Penda, the pagan king.:-
Three crosses raised at Penda’s dire commands,
Bore Oswald’s royal head and mangled hands ;
To stand a sad example to the rest,
And prove him wretched who is ever blest.
Vain policy ! for what the victor got,
Proved to the vanquished king the happier lot;
For now the martyred saint in glory views
How Oswy with success the war renews,
And Penda scarcely can support his throne,
Whilst Oswald wears a never-fading crown.
Pennant calls the spot where the battle was fought
Maeshir, the long field. Others call it Mesafield,
Campus Mesafeld Sanctorum canduit ossa.
(Archaeo-logia Cambrensis, 4 Ser. No. 15, 246,).
(6) Life of St. Oswald, by Alfric ; and Gentleman’s Magazine, August 1866, p. 167.
(7) Journal Arch. Inst., 1862, No’ 76, p. 327.
(8) Dr. Hook, Memoir on Wulstan, Journal of Arch. Inst., 1863, No. 76,
(9) Britton’s Cathedral Antiquities, v. p. n % Fabric Rolls of York, Surtees Soc, p. 151,
(10) Hist. Whalley, 4g, 50 250; Craven, 185, 204 ; Richmond, i. 329; i. 229 ^ Raine’s Archbishops of York, i. 42.
(11) Hist. Charles I. 313.
(12) Tanner’s Monast. 92.
(13) Batty’s Priory of Nostel, (Bell and Daldy,) 1856, pp. 3, 8.
(14) Testa de Nevil, quoted in Dugdale’s Monasticon, vol. III 92.
(15) Brit. Mus. Addl. MSS., 15351, 43. t Batty’s Priory of Nostel, 20.
(16) Notes to Lay of the Last Minstrel.
(17)Whalley Coucher Book, 3g, 40.
(18) Hist. Lanc iii., 117, in notes, where the date is incorrectly given.
(19) See a curious Lowton pedigree, id., 634.
(20) Testa de Nevil, 405, and return of holdings in 13 John in the Red Book of the Exchequer.
(21) Hist. Lanc iv., 820.
(22) Canon Raines’ Notitia Cest.
(23) Whalley Coucher Book, 146.
(23a) Legh Charters.
(24) Copy Culcheth Charter, penes me.
(25) Fifth Rep. on Pub. Records, p. 66.
(26) Legh Charters.
(27) Lancash. Chantries, Chet.So. i. 74, and copy of the Prior’s Charter penes me.
(28) Gastrel’s Not. Cest., Chet. So., ii. 262
(29) Tax. Papse Nic.
(30) Legh Charters.
(31) Legh deeds.
(32) Lichfield Register.
(33) Endowment of the Haydock Chantrey.
(34) Boteler deeds,
(35) Legh deeds.
(36) Hist. Lanc, iv. 820.
(37) Legh deeds.
(38) Halton Rolls.
(39) 125. Cyprinus Leuiscus.—Silvery yellow, olive on tail; the back dorsal fin brown, 10-rayed, the rest reddish; anal fin 11-rayed; much forked. Dace. Donovan t. 77. Shaw Zool. v. t. 130. Body fiom half a foot to a foot long, rather slender; head small ; iris yellowish ; jaws equal; back a little convex; ventral fins with pointed appendages ; lateral line a little curved downwards; dorsal fin 10-rayed; pectoral 18 ; ventral 9 ; anal 11 ; tail 22-rayed. 2. Body slenderer; back straight; eyesred. Grayning. Br.Zool. 3. p..367. Shaw., 5. 234. Resembles the dace, and is about 7^ inches long; but the back is silvery with bluish cast, and the ventral fins redder; dorsal fin 6-rayed, pectoral 15 ; tail 32-rayed. (Turton’s Fauna, p. 109.)
(40) Proceedings of the Lane, and Ches. Hist. Society, 1871, p. 107.
(41) Gray’s Reg. Surtees Society, p. 4.
(42) Raine’s "Archbishops of York, " p. 365.
(43) Tanner’s Notitia Monastica, 646.
(44) Lancashire Chantries, Chet. So. i., 67, 68,
(45) Lancashire Chantries, Chet. So. i. 67, 8.
(46) Hist. Chet. So. i. 260.
(47) Culcheth Deeds.
(48) Athena? Cantab., i. 16, 525.
(49) Athena? Cantab., i. 16, 525. Hist. Ches. i. 343.
(50) Ibid.
(51) Whitaker’s Richmondshire, ii. 245.
(52) 5 Rep.
(53) 108,125.
(54) Baines’ Hist, of Liverpool, 86.
(55) Duchy Calendar.
(56) Collin’s Peerage, iii. 89. .
(57) Stanley papers, Chet. Soc, 14.
(58) Fiddes’ Life of Wolsey.
(59) Renaud’s Fasti Oxon., and Dr. Renaud’s Prestbury, Chet. So., 94.
(60) Lichf. Reg. .
(61) Fiddes’ Life of Wolsey, i6g app.
(62) Fiddes’Life of Wolsey, p. 163, appendix.
(63) Lane, and Ches. Historic Society’s Proceedings, vol. vi., new series, p. 70, where a fac-simile of the passage is given.
(64) Froude’s Hist. Eng., i., innotis, p. 46, et passim.
(65) Lancashire Chantries, by Chet. Soc, 62 to 72.
(66) Lich. Reg.
(67) Lancashire and Ches. Wills, Chet. So., part II., 138.
(68) Lanc. Chantries, Chetham Soc., pref. xxvii.
(69) Idem, part ii., pp. 99, 100.
(70) Calendar of the Duchy of Lancaster.
(71) Blackstone’s Corns., II., 320.
(72) July 27th, 1861, p. 61.
(73) Lan. Chantries, Chet. Soc, i. 58, in notis.
(74) From a copy in the Public Record Office obtained by J. E. Bailey, Esq.
(75) Lane, and Ches. Wills, Chetham So., part III.
(76) Hist. Lanc.,iii. 540, and iv. 277.
(77) Lancashire Chantries, Chet. So., i. 6g, in notis.
(78) Lancashire and Cheshire Wills, Chet. So., i. 148.
(79) Hist. Lanc. iii. 625.
(80) Hist. Lanc. iii. 100, and Parker Correspondence.
(81) Froude’s Hist. Eng. ii. 416.
(82) Campbell’s Lives of the Chancellors.
(83) Journal of the Royal Archaeological Institute, No. 107, p. 190.
(84) Hist. Lanc, i. 543.
(85) Derby Household Books, Chet. So., p. 132 in notis.
(86) Lane, and Ches. Wills, Chet. So., ii. 19.
(87) Notes and Queries, Feb. 11, 1865.
(88) Chet. So., 116, 182.
(89) Hist. Lanc, i. 541.
(90) Hist. Ches., i. 323.
(91) Stanley Papers, Chet. So., ii. 133.
(92) Haydn’s Book of Dignities.
(93) Watts’s Bibliotheca and Mag. Brit. Antiq. et Nova.
(94) See the case in the library in Exeter Coll., Cat. 32.
(95) Hist. Chesh., i. 222.
(96) Court and Times of Charles I., p. 38.
(97) Calamy’s Nonconform., ii. 299.
(98) Hist. Lanc , iii. 475.
(99) Scobell’s Acts.
(100) Hollingworth’s Manchester, 125.
(101) Athenae Oxon., ii. 258, and iii. 504; Hunter’s life of Heywood, 89 ; Martin-dale’s Life, Chet. So., 90.
(102) The hall was not then occupied by the rector, but by Sir Edward Stanley, the lessee of the living.
(103) Stanley Papers, Chet. So., p. iii., v. i.xliii.
(104) Clarandon’s Hist, of the Rebellion, iii. 181
(105) Peacock’s Army Lists, p. 61.
(106) Oldmixon’s Hist. Eng., ii. 231.
(107) Stanley’s West. Abbey, 505
(108) Hist. Lanc, ii, 39.
(109) Hist. Lanc, iv. 812. f Civil War Tracts, Chetham So., 264.
(110) Cromwell’s Letters, vol. i. 360.
(111) Original penes Whitehall Dod, esquire.
(112) Seacome’s Mem. of the House of Stanley, 128-9.
(113) Manchester Recorder, 22.
(114) Macray’s Lecture on Howe.
(115) Boase and Courtenay’s Biblia Cornubiensis.
(116) MSS. in C.C. Lib., Cambridge Cat., page 166.
(117) The Winwick terrier of 27 May, 1701, says all the glebe and tithes of Winwick were leased out in the 5 Eliz., for the term of 99 years, at a rent of about £200 per annum.
(118) Keble’sLife of Wilson, i. 53, and Pref. to Practical Christian, edit. 1846 p.52.
(119) Kennet’s Register and Chronicle, p. 185 ; Wood’s Athena?, Bliss edit., iv. 259 ; and Journals of the House of Lords, June 20, 1660.
(120) Barrow became bishop of St. Asaph and held also the bishopric of Man in commendam ; Gunning became Bishop of Ely. Both the Bishops were Cambridge graduates. The sneer at the cavalier chaplains might be spared when it is recollected that besides Sherlock, Jeremy Taylor, Fuller and Pearson were among them.
(121) Hist. Lanc, iii. 476.
(122) Macaulay’s Hist. Eng.
(123) Wood’s Athena?, Keble’s Life of Wilson, Hickes’s Life of Kettlewell, Whit-taker’s Richmondshire, ii. 313-14-15 ; and Hist. Ches., ii. 388-89-90.
(124) Hist. Eccles, p. 23.
(125) Mr. Hy. Prescott, of Chester.
(126) Keble’s Life of Wilson, i. 41-45.
(127) Sacra Privata, edit. 1841
(128) Winwick Terrier of 1701.
(129) Wilson’s Life, by Keble, pp. 45-35-36; Blundell MSS. and Jacobite Trials at Manchester, both by Chetham Soc. 88.
(130) Wilson’s Life, by Keble, 118.
(131) A short notice of this preacher, who was at one time Vicar of Ormskirk, will be found in the Lan. and Chesh. Hist. Soc. Proceedings, 3 series, vol. v., pp. 130-1.
(132) Bunbury’s Reports, 231.
(133) Gent.’s Mag. x. 262.
(134) Gregson’s Fragments.
(135) Collins’ Peerage, iii. 98.
(136) Copy of inscription on mural tablet in south aisle of Winwick Church,
Lancashire:—
Requiescit in Spe Jacobus Joannes Hornby Patris ejusdem nominis Hujus Ecclesise Rectoris Et Hesteras uxoris ejus. Filiorum natu major
(137) Reg. Northbury, Lichfield.
(138) Lan. mss. vol. 38, p. 237.
(139) Legh deeds.
(140) Legh mss.
(141) Calendar to Duchy Pleadings p. 156
(142) Hist. Lanc i, 500.
(143) lbid.
(144) Lan. Chantries, Chet. So. p. 100.
(145) Lane. Chantries, I., 72 note.
(146) Add. MSS. Brit. Mus. 15351. 43.
(147) In the Winwick terrier of 27 May, 1701, all the land in Winwick and Hulme is stated to be glebe, belonging to the rector, except three or four pieces of land in Hulme which are particularized. There is no mention of the school land unless a cottage and an acre of land belonging to Mr. Ed, Herle, and said to be in Hulme, are meant for it, which can hardly be ? How the site of the school in Winwick was acquired is not clear.
(148) Lan. and Ches. Wills, II. 99.
(149) Waddington’s Congregational Hist., 511.
(150) Some years after his death the following epitaph, which was quite unworthy of him, was placed on his grave:—
Under this stone lies Richard Mather, Who had a son greater than his father, And he a grandson greater than either.
Lan. and Ches. Hist. So. 3 Ser. v. 38.
(151) lb- 639.
(152) Byrom’s Remains, Chet So., i. 196.
(153) Report on the Lancashire Charities, 196 and 972. John Sutton, son of John Sutton " in agro Lanca. 31. e schola Winwick, sub pra? sidio mag. Wright," was admitted when he was ig in 1731 to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took his A.B. degree in 1733. He was curate or incumbent of the chapel of ease to Garstang church from 1734 to 1736, having previously been schoolmaster of Daresbury.—Information of Colonel Fishwick.
(154) One of these boys, who was called John Joaquim Geta De Bruby de Broquens, had a name long enough to have scared the innkeeper, who refused to open his doors to the don whose many names he mistook for a number of persons.
(155) Report on the Lancashire Charities, p. 196 and 972.
(156) Manchester School Register, Chet. So., vol. iii. part i. 96.
(157) Hist. Lanc, iii. 625.
(158) The learned author of the paper, in throwing a doubt upon the antiquity of this stone club, seems to be entirely in error. It is wrought of clink stone or hone slate, a material not known within a great distance from the place where it was found. Similar clubs are to be seen in the museums of the curious and are allowed to be British.
(159) Nov. 15, 4th series, p. 236.
(161) Testa de Nevil, 405, 6.
(162) Hist. Richmondshire, II. 329, and Hist. Lanc I. 280 ;
(163) Hist. Lanc. III. 620.
(164) Ibid.
(165) Ibid. I., 282. 1" Burn’s Hist. Westmoreland, 123, 33.
(166) Dodsworth’s mss. ft Excerpta Rot. Fin. p. 60.
(167) Hist. Lanc IV., 436, and Inq. P.M., 42 Hen. III., p. 17.
(168) Calendar Genealog. p. 78.
(169) Hist. Lanc III. 634.
(170) Dodsworth’s MSS.
(171) Visitation of Lancashire by St. George in 1613, p. 117,
(172) Lichf. Reg,
(173) Legh Deeds. ,
(174) Culcheth Deeds.
(175) Whalley Coucher b. Chet. So. 459.
(176) Cockersand Rental, Chet. So. Miscellanies iii., 34.
(177) Warrington in 1465 Chet. So. pref. xl.
(178) Hist. Lanc i., 277.
(179) Culcheth and Legh Deeds.
(180) Madox. Form, Anglic. 28.
(181) Foedera, II., 648.
(182) Hist. Lanc. I., 341, III., 524-534.
(183) Chet. So. 93-94
(184) Boteler Deeds.
(185) Grosvenor Controversy and Inq. P.M. 15 Ric. II. .
(186) Hist. Ches. II. 72.
(187) Lancs. Inqs. Chet. So. p. 71.
(188) Chet. So. I., 36.
(189) Hist. Lanc Hi., 540. .
(190) Ibid 622.
(191) Brit. Lib. May, 1737. .
(192) Collins’ Peerage, iii., 78.
(193) Trials of the Jacobites in 1694, Chet. So., pp. 67-8.
(194) Camden’s Britannia. .
(195) Warrington in 1465, Chet. So. pref. xxv.
(196) An interesting account of the oak and the banquet referred to will be found in the Transactions of the Lan. and Ches. Hist. So. Proceedings, 3 series, vol. v. P- 33-
(197) The only stone in the churchyard which is older than this is dated 1652, and has only initials upon it.
(198) Miscell. Pal. 69-0.
(199) Black Tribunal, 389.
(200) Chet. S. 506.
(201) Harl. MS., 2129-656.

 

 

 


Transcribed by Steven Dowd from the original book which he owns, Originally publication is from 1878, this text version and layout, edits and errors is © 2008 Steven Dowd, for use at the Newton-le-willows website